Register with Bluefield for immediate, free access
to water market data and analysis.
Login

04 June 2019 / Reese Tisdale
Bluefield ranked the biggest influencers at the largest U.S. water conference next week…


In every industry there is a group of influencers setting the tone for change. Municipal water is no different. Bluefield’s team of water experts is heading to Denver next week for ACE19, the largest drinking water conference in the U.S., joining over 8,000 other water industry colleagues. In preparation, we analyzed the conference agenda, including 838 presenters and 351 companies. Our view is that the sector is becoming more competitive, influence is valuable, and companies are positioning themselves as such.

So, whether you are off to Colorado or sitting this one out, Bluefield Research wants to be your eyes and ears. This is our initial take on the conference to help us help you.

Ranking the Influencers: Top 25 Companies by ACE19 Presentations 

Source: AWWA, Bluefield Research

  • Engineering firms control conference proceedings. Of the 838 conference presentations, 38% are associated with engineering, procurement, and construction companies (EPC). Among the Top 25 presenting companies, 16 are engineering firms.  This is consistent with our water experts’ take on EPCs playing gatekeepers to vendors seeking to penetrate water and wastewater utilities.
  • CDM Smith ranks as the biggest influencer this year. CDM Smith takes the top spot with 33 separate presentations, followed by Carollo Engineers, Hazen and Sawyer, Jacobs, and Arcadis. As the municipal sector transitions to address emerging challenges (e.g. PFAS) and solutions (e.g. digital water), these companies are poised to play key roles in procurement decisions.
  • Utilities influence conversation. Both public and private water utilities fall in the top 10 with Denver Water at no. 6 and American Water at no. 7. Outside of the top 25, Colorado Springs Utilities, DC Water and Sewer, and LADWP also make the top 40. In conversations with clients across the value chain, focus on understanding utilities’ needs is becoming more complex, so their larger presence gives attendees several opportunities to hear their perspectives.
  • Does the presence of EPA and CDC in the top 25 reinforce industry’s focus water quality? Questions abound about role of federal agencies in today’s political climateWhile consent decrees may soon wane because of recent administrative policies, PFAS is in the news every day. It will be interesting to share perspectives with colleagues from the Center for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency.
  • 65% of the speakers at AWWA ACE19 are men. Of the 838 speakers at the conference, 547 are male and 291 are female. While this may reflect the water industry today, the role of women in water is changing for the better. This was recently demonstrated at Women in Water, an event in California at the end of 2018 that attended by Bluefield’s Erin Bonney. We hope to continue to see more diversity at future water conferences.

Take advantage of the time and meet with Bluefield. From water infrastructure investment to PFAS, we are looking forward to discussing the most relevant issues affecting the municipal water industry at ACE19. Our team of water experts will be in Denver from June 10-12 and would appreciate the opportunity to meet with you and your colleagues.

Our schedule is filling up, so contact us by clicking this link or email us at waterexperts@bluefieldresearch.com to secure a spot on our calendar. 

Reese Tisdale
President & CEO

Reese Tisdale has an extensive background in industry research, strategic advisory, and environmental consulting in the power and energy industries. Prior to co-founding Bluefield, Mr. Tisdale was Research Director for IHS Emerging Energy Research, a leading research and advisory firm focused on renewable energy. He also has demonstrated experience in groundwater remediation for oil & gas companies and as an international market analyst for Thermo Fisher Scientific.

Mr. Tisdale’s interest in critical infrastructure needs and developing markets is influenced by his three years in El Salvador, where he led water supply and agriculture projects immediately following the country’s civil war. He has a BS in Natural Resources from The University of the South, Sewanee and a Master in Business Administration from Thunderbird: The American Graduate School of International Management.





"Water is actually getting more expensive," ...Economic considerations remain the first drivers in water conservation and reuse @ErinBonneyCasey | Water Scarcity Drives Industrial Reclamation Efforts | AW shar.es/aXPB5W via @automationworld #WaterReuse #CostofWater

The Year in Infrastructure 2019
Oct 21-24 / Singapore 

Aquatech Innovation Forum
Nov 4 / Amsterdam, NL

21 Oct 2019 Water Scarcity Drives Industrial Reclamation Efforts

26 Sep 2019 Bluefield Breakfast Briefing WEFTEC19: Market Disruptors & the Future of Wastewater